dallas cowboys owner jerry jones

dallas cowboys owner jerry jones
dallas cowboys owner jerry jones

dallas cowboys owner jerry jones

Jerry Jones

Gerald Wayne Jones (born October 13, 1942) [1] is an American businessman who has been the owner, president, and general manager of the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL) since February 1989.

Early life


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Jones was born in Los Angeles, California to John “Pat” and Arminetta Jones. The family moved back to North Little Rock, Arkansas in 1945. His parents owned two branches of Pet’s Supermarket in the Rose City neighborhood of North Little Rock.[3] Jones was a running back at North Little Rock High School, graduating in 1960.

After graduation, Jones’ parents moved to Springfield, Missouri, where Pat was president and chairman of Modern Security Life Insurance Company in 1961. His first statement in 1965 was $6,230,607. After graduating from the University of Arkansas, Jerel W. Jones was listed as executive vice president. With the company’s success, Jones assembled the 5,500-acre Buena Vista Ranch east of Springfield in Rogersville, Missouri, in the Ozark Mountains. In 1971, after selling to an insurance company, the couple developed 400 acres of their ranch to start Buena Vista Animal Paradise, where tourists can see exotic animals (now Wild Animal Safari Strafford, Missouri, on Interstate 44 just south of). ]

College football career

dallas cowboys owner jerry jones
dallas cowboys owner jerry jones

dallas cowboys owner jerry jones


Jones attended the University of Arkansas, where he was a member of Kappa Sigma fraternity.[6] He was co-captain of Arkansas’ 1964 national championship football team. He was an offensive lineman for College Football Hall of Fame coach Frank Briles and fellow college football and NFL coach Jimmy Johnson, whom Jones hired as his first head coach after purchasing the Cowboys.[7 ]

Other notable teammates were Glenn Ray Hines, a consensus All-American offensive tackle. Ken Hatfield, who coached several major programs, including Arkansas. Jim Lindsay; future Outland Trophy winner Lloyd Phillips; and College Football Hall of Fame linebacker Ronnie Keunis. Several future head coaches were assistant coaches on Briles’ Razorbacks staff during Jones’ college career at Fayetteville, including three more members of the College Football Hall of Fame: Hayden Fry (Southern Methodist University, North Texas State University, and University of Iowa) Johnny Majors (Iowa State University, University of Pittsburgh, and University of Tennessee), and Barry Switzer (University of Oklahoma, and later head coach of the Cowboys under Jones).[8]

Jones is one of a very small number of NFL owners who achieved significant success as a football player.

Business plans


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According to an interview with Jones on HBO, after graduating college in 1965, he borrowed a million dollars from Jimmy Hoffa’s Teamsters union to open a Shakey’s Pizza Parlor restaurant in Missouri. Employed by his father’s insurance company, Modern Security Life of Springfield, Missouri. He earned a master’s degree in business in 1970. After several other failed business ventures (including an attempt to repurpose Teamsters money to buy the San Diego Chargers of the American Football League in 1967), [10] he started an oil and gas exploration business. In Arkansas, Jones Oil and Lend Lease, which became successful. His private company is currently prospecting for natural resources.

In 2008, Jones partnered with Yankee Global Enterprises to form Legends Hospitality, a food, beverage, merchandise, retail, and stadium operations corporation serving entertainment venues.


Dallas Cowboys
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On February 25, 1989, Jones sent the Cowboys H.R. Purchased from “Bum” Bright for $140 million (equivalent to $292.5 million in 2020).[13] Shortly after the purchase, he fired longtime coach Tom Landry, the only coach in team history up to that point. [14] who favored his old teammate Jimmy Johnson at Arkansas.[7] A few months later, he fired longtime general manager Tex Schramm, and assumed full control of football affairs.

After a slow start under Jones and Johnson (first season under Jones, finishing 1–15, [16] second only to the team’s inaugural season in futility), [17] Jones quickly built a team Which is often considered the best. NFL franchise of the 1990s. The Cowboys won Super Bowl XXVII in the 1992 season, [18] as well as Super Bowl XXVII the following year in the 1993 season. [19] Johnson then left and was replaced by Barry Switzer, who returned in 1995. won Super Bowl XXX in the season.[20]

At the time of the sale, the financially troubled Bright claimed to be losing $1 million per month on the franchise. During Jones’ tenure, the Cowboys have been valued at an estimated $5.5 billion, making their owner a billionaire in the process.[22] Much of the league’s financial success since 1989 has been credited to Jones himself. . In particular, he was decisive in securing Fox as the NFC’s primary broadcaster at a time when the traditional “Big Three” networks were trying to convince the league to accept a rollback in television rights fees. [23]

Increased television revenue has played a decisive role in positioning the NFL as the richest sports league in the world, with revenues exceeding $10 billion per season.[24]

The 2020 NFL season was Jones’ 32nd as owner of the Cowboys, more than his predecessors combined.

Criticism

dallas cowboys owner jerry jones
dallas cowboys owner jerry jones

dallas cowboys owner jerry jones

In an October 8, 2003, online poll, JonZ was named the least favorite sports personality in three states (Virginia, Delaware and Texas) by Sports Illustrated.

Jones is often maligned by fans who are bitter over the unceremonious firings of longtime Cowboys personnel who were fan favorites, including head coach Tom Landry and general manager Tex Schramm, although the Cowboys previously held positions before Jones became owner. Had a poor performance in some seasons. Jones said he didn’t consider keeping Landry for even a season, because he said he wouldn’t buy the team until he hired Johnson as coach. Jones did not discuss the matter with Landry before announcing the decision. It was condemned by football fans and the media as a lack of class and respect, as pride and tradition were part of the Cowboys, where excellence and loyal service were expected to be rewarded. Since the firing, Jones has indicated that he regrets the process of Landry’s firing and his role in it. It was later revealed that Jones’ predecessor, Bright, had been dissatisfied with Landry for years and offered to spare Jones the inevitable criticism by firing the longtime coach before selling the team.[23 ] Bright wanted to fire Landry as early as 1987, only because Schramm told him that no suitable replacement was available.

Some fan criticism has been due to Jones’ high visibility and inclusion as the “face of the team”, [28] unlike both Bright and the Cowboys’ original owner, Clint Murchison Jr., Jones’ prominent role has impressed fans. . expressed displeasure with Jones and the franchise’s lack of success, particularly with criticism of Jones’ tenure as their general manager. Jones was particularly criticized for his conflict with head coach Jimmy Johnson, as Jones “wanted Cowboys fans to know he helped build Super Bowl-winning teams”, while “Johnson insisted that he made all personnel moves” because he made the final decision in football matters and refused to relinquish that power. As a result, Jones ousted Johnson after the 1993 season despite winning two consecutive Super Bowls and refused to induct Johnson into the Cowboys’ Ring of Honor. Jones also initially promised head coach Bill Parcells full control of football matters. However, their relationship fell apart after Jones signed controversial wide receiver Terrell Owens. Parcells’ successor, Wade Phillips, complained to friends of “repeated weak and second-guessing” by Jones.

Jones is one of two owners in the league (the other being Cincinnati’s Mike Brown) who have either the title or the authority of general manager. In 2018, he told Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Mark Lane that serving as his own general manager helped streamline decision-making and communication lines with the coaching staff.[31] Jones’ In the era, Cowboys fans made several grassroots efforts to remove Jones from his position.

Jones is the subject of David Magee’s 2008 book Playing to Win. In the book, Jones admitted that he handled Landry’s firing poorly and accepted some of the blame for the breakdown of his relationship with Landry’s successor, Jimmy Johnson.[citation needed]

Jones joined Stan Kroenke in 2016 when the St. Louis Rams moved back to Los Angeles. He was instrumental in brokering a deal between Stan Kroenke, San Diego Chargers owner Dan Espinos, and Oakland Raiders owner Mark Davis to ensure that the Kroenke Couch Stadium plan was approved, which he 30- 2 owners voted in favour. Jones’ support and role in the negotiations were criticized by some fans and sports media in St. Louis.[33] Jones was also a key supporter of the Oakland Raiders’ move to Las Vegas to play in Allegiant Stadium.


NFL Penalties
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Jones was fined $25,000 by the NFL on September 14, 2008, for publicly criticizing referee Ed Hochuli after he called a game between the San Diego Chargers and the Denver Broncos. Jones said in comments both to the press and on his radio show. Hochuli was one of the most criticized officials in the NFL. It was Jones’ first penalty by the NFL.

dallas cowboys owner jerry jones
dallas cowboys owner jerry jones

In 2009, Jones was fined $100,000 for violating a gag order on labor issues, commenting that revenue sharing was “on the verge of extinction”. Commissioner Roger Goodell issued an order for all owners and team executives to refrain from discussing any aspect of the pending L.U.B. issues. Sources said Jones “crossed the line,” drawing a “six-figure” fine, as the commissioner distributed a memo to all 32 owners, along with a reminder that the gag order was in effect. Goodell did not disclose the specific amount of Jones’ fine in the memo.
The conflict
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In November 2022, a photo surfaced from 1957 showing a fourteen-year-old Jerry Jones leading an argument where Caucasian students tried to prevent six African-American students from entering North Little Rock High School in Arkansas. . North Little Rock was beginning to integrate in 1957.

The school’s head football coach ordered the team (of which Jones was a part) to stay away from such scenes.In reality, Jones said he was there as a curious spectator. Jones also said: “I don’t know that I or anybody had any idea or had the background to know what was involved. It was more interesting.

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